"Most editors are failed writers - but so are most writers." -T.S. Eliot

Some factoids about me:

My name is Emily. I am a bisexual feminist who is currently studying English at the University of New Mexico.

This blog is a personal blog, so it's mainly reblogs of stuff that I think is cool, selfies, and angsty text posts. Sometimes I will post some of my drawings or writing, but that's pretty infrequent.

Thanks for taking a look at my blog; I hope you like what you see! xoxo

 

lennon-in-the-sky-with-timelords:

So my cousin was in a gay pride parade and everything in her outfit and makeup was rainbow but she was wearing red contacts and while marching, a protester behind her yelled “You’re going straight to hell” and she turns around to face him with her fuCKING blood red eyes and she says “well duh, I got a kindom to run” and the protester nearly fucking passed out that is her legacy I want to be like her

wailtothethief:

Fuck I’m walking downtown and I pass a group of guys staring at me and I think “great catcall time” but then one guy goes “you look like you could kill a man a million different ways with just your bare hands”. This. This is an acceptable comment to give a girl on the street.

nantajoong:

fraubraun:

koreanstudentsspeak:

Left:

I want a go home I’m tired

Right:

Don’t Hit ME


what’s happenin in korea

You want to know what’s happening? Korea’s education system is literally the most rotten piece of shit to ever exist. 
Let me explain the context of the poster on the left. 
The average time a kid spends in school in the US is 900 to 1000 hours per year, spread between 175-180 days (x)
In 2007 there were mass student protests in Netherlands because they increased the hours spent in school to 1040 hours per year, or 8 hours a day, 130 days a year. (x)
Korean high schools, on the other hand, enact a 3150 policy, 225 days of school with 14 hours a day, or from 8 am to 10 pm (x)
Also due to the private education sector of hagwons and the fierce competition of Korean high schools, basically after school kids go to hagwons, or personal academies, till 2, 3 in the morning, fit in maybe 4, 5 hours of sleep and go back to school. (x)
It was only in 2012 that schools went from having classes on Saturday excluding the first and third Saturday, and it was only in 2007 when they changed from having class every Saturday. (x)
This system is literally the epitome of the factory schooling system which comes as a result of a capitalistic schooling system and it works kids too hard which is one of the reasons Korean school kids are some of the unhappiest of pretty much any OECD country. (x)
For the photo on the right, physical punishment is not fully banned in Korea. 
Since 2011, Seoul, Gyunggido, Gangwondo, and Julla Bukdo have banned the use of direct physical punishment, or basically hitting kids with either tools or physically with their body. That being said that’s basically only about half of South Korea. 
Also, indirect physical punishment such as making kids to planks, make them kneel with their hands up, making them run laps, or of the sort is still fully acceptable in all Korean schools. (x)
Anybody who’s a Korean in a Korean school right now already has experience with getting beat by a teacher and some kids still have to deal with physical punishment by teachers. 

nantajoong:

fraubraun:

koreanstudentsspeak:

Left:

I want a go home I’m tired

Right:

Don’t Hit ME

what’s happenin in korea

You want to know what’s happening? Korea’s education system is literally the most rotten piece of shit to ever exist. 

Let me explain the context of the poster on the left. 

The average time a kid spends in school in the US is 900 to 1000 hours per year, spread between 175-180 days (x)

In 2007 there were mass student protests in Netherlands because they increased the hours spent in school to 1040 hours per year, or 8 hours a day, 130 days a year. (x)

Korean high schools, on the other hand, enact a 3150 policy, 225 days of school with 14 hours a day, or from 8 am to 10 pm (x)

Also due to the private education sector of hagwons and the fierce competition of Korean high schools, basically after school kids go to hagwons, or personal academies, till 2, 3 in the morning, fit in maybe 4, 5 hours of sleep and go back to school. (x)

It was only in 2012 that schools went from having classes on Saturday excluding the first and third Saturday, and it was only in 2007 when they changed from having class every Saturday. (x)

This system is literally the epitome of the factory schooling system which comes as a result of a capitalistic schooling system and it works kids too hard which is one of the reasons Korean school kids are some of the unhappiest of pretty much any OECD country. (x)

For the photo on the right, physical punishment is not fully banned in Korea. 

Since 2011, Seoul, Gyunggido, Gangwondo, and Julla Bukdo have banned the use of direct physical punishment, or basically hitting kids with either tools or physically with their body. That being said that’s basically only about half of South Korea. 

Also, indirect physical punishment such as making kids to planks, make them kneel with their hands up, making them run laps, or of the sort is still fully acceptable in all Korean schools. (x)

Anybody who’s a Korean in a Korean school right now already has experience with getting beat by a teacher and some kids still have to deal with physical punishment by teachers. 

Conversation with my very religious mother

Me: did you know that it is a sin to where that shirt and you could go to hell?

Mom:

Me: I mean it has mixed fabrics.

Me: According to the bible, that's a sin.

Mom: show me where it says that

Me: levictus 19:19

"'Keep my decrees.

“‘Do not mate different kinds of animals.

“‘Do not plant your field with two kinds of seed.

“‘Do not wear clothing woven of two kinds of material.

Mom:

Mom:

Mom: well just because it says that doesn't mean you can say its a sin and we'll go to hell

Me: so why are people doing that with homosexuality

farorescourage:

seraphknights:

pastel-gizibe:

perpetualvelocity:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

i feel like this is older than me

WowLook at this relic

Fucking fossil lol

you mean aged like fine wine

this is older than some of the people on this website god damn

farorescourage:

seraphknights:

pastel-gizibe:

perpetualvelocity:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

i feel like this is older than me

Wow
Look at this relic

Fucking fossil lol

you mean aged like fine wine

this is older than some of the people on this website god damn

(Source: kittiezandtittiez)

lost-in-the-fandom-life:

onlinewifey:

spaghettihos:

REBLOG IF I SHOULD GET THESE TATTOOED ON MY NIPPLES

image

1 million notes and i’ll do it

let’s ruin this persons life and reblog

I read that as REBLOG IF I SHOULD GET THIGHS TATTOOED ON MY NIPPLES

deadxlast:

pianorocknroll:

you know how every girl in the world has a secret code with her girlfriends for when they need a tampon well when I was younger the code was ‘japan is attacking, do you have supplies’ I feel like I shouldn’t have to explain the joke but just to be safe

image

Oh my fucking god

thelunaticyouarelookingfor:

sernacht:

So, I was in the car today and saw someone with the license plate “X0DUS3 5”, so I thought it was like Exodus 3:5 and I looked it up, and do you know what it said?

"Do not come any closer."

Now that’s a well done biblical license plate.

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

Officer: C'mon people, clear the scene--

Me: this ain't a scene it's a

Officer: dont u dare

Me: gOD

Officer: stop

Me: dDAMN

Officer: SToP

Me: ARMS

Officer: rACE